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Dutch government coughs up 'millions' for extended Windows XP support

Follows in the UK government footsteps with last-minute lifeline
Mon Apr 07 2014, 11:36
Windows XP feature image

THE DUTCH GOVERNMENT has followed the UK's lead by coughing up millions for an additional year of Windows XP support, ahead of the PC operating system's End of Life on Tuesday.

Dutch news website Webwerald reported that the Dutch government has spent millions to secure custom Windows XP support from Microsoft, which will see its PCs covered until April 2015.

It's unclear how much the deal is worth, but the report claims that the government owns between 34,000 and 40,000 Windows XP machines, with Microsoft likely to charge around €200 per PC for its tailored support. This means that the deal likely is costing Dutch taxpayers between €6.8m and €8m, compared to the UK government's £5.5m Windows XP support deal.

The report added that, as part of the migration deal, Microsoft requires that the government PCs will be upgraded to a newer version of its Windows operating system - either Windows 7 or Windows 8 - before the support contract has ended. It is unclear whether the UK government was handed similar requirements when it signed a Windows XP extension deal last week.

The UK deal, which was signed last week, saw the Crown Commercial Service (CCS) - a new cabinet office department that handles public sector purchasing and commercial operations - negotiating a £5.48m deal with Microsoft to provide extended Windows XP support until April 2015.

A Microsoft spokesperson said, "We have made an agreement with the Crown Commercial Service to provide eligible UK public sector organisations with the ability to download security updates to Windows XP, Office 2003 and Exchange 2003 for one year until April 8 2015."

"Agreements such as these do not remove the need to move off Windows XP as soon as possible," Microsoft added.

It is thought that the UK banking sector will sign a similar deal with Microsoft ahead of tomorrow's cutoff, but this is still to be seen. µ

 

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