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Hackers hijack DCMS Twitter to slam government stance on expenses

MP Maria Miller mugged
Mon Apr 07 2014, 10:32
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HACKERS HAVE TAKEN OVER a UK government Twitter account and posted less than flattering comments about MP Maria Miller and her expenses claims.

We say hackers, but it could have been an angry and rather politicised insider who was frustrated with Miller.

There were at least three messages, none of which would have been published had they been anywhere near MP Miller's staff.

"Seriously though guys which one of us hasn't embezzled and cheated the taxpayer?? #FreeMariaMiller", read the first message that was posted to the DCMS Twitter account on Saturday evening.

This was swiftly followed by other messages, one of which compared the MP to Robin Hood, a British folk hero who robbed the rich to feed the poor. A third message asked whether the MP is guilty, adding that the public would decide.

The messages were live for less than twenty minutes, but they were spotted and shared by a number of parties before they were removed.

A DCMS spokesperson told The INQUIRER, "The DCMS Twitter account was hacked but was quickly secured. It is now being investigated. "

The MP is in the scandal spotlight because she has been accused of having falsely claimed almost £50,000 in expenses in order to support two houses and obtain liquid cash.

Miller has apologised in the House of Commons and has been ordered to kick back around £6,000 in mortgage payments, but many people think that she has been given an easy ride.

The DCMS is not the first outfit to have an apparently loose grasp on Twitter, and many other organisations also feature in the 'what happened there?' graveyard. Sky, for example, was once thrown into confusion by a 'Colin'. µ

 

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