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Android 4.4 Kitkat install base climbs to 5.3 percent as Jelly Bean shrinks

Latest version still unlikely to dominate in 2014
Wed Apr 02 2014, 15:33
Android 4.4 Kitkat statue

GOOGLE'S ANDROID 4.4 KITKAT has more than doubled its share of devices to 5.3 percent, while Android 4.x Jelly Bean's share has started to shrink.

This time last month, we reported that Android 4.4 Kitkat was struggling to reach the three percent mark, having claimed just 2.5 percent of active devices since its debut last October.

Google's April statistics paint a better picture, however, with Android 4.4 Kitkat more than doubling its adoption rate to 5.3 percent at the beginning of the month. This is likely to only increase too, with the HTC One M8 now on store shelves and the Samsung Galaxy S5 set to follow soon.

What's more, with Kitkat's growing share comes Jelly Bean's decline. While it hasn't taken a big hit, Jelly Bean's market share has dipped to 61.4 percent, down from 62 percent the month before. While it's down, this shows that Jelly Bean still has a huge share of Android devices, and suggests that despite Kitkat smartphones arriving on shelves and software updates rolling out, Android 4.4 Kitkat is unlikely to take the dominant share this year.

The oldest version of Jelly Bean is still the most popular, with Android 4.1.x taking a 34.4 percent share, while Android 4.2.x and Android 4.3 claimed 18.1 and 8.9 percent, respectively.

Android 4.0.x has taken a hit, too. In March the dated software was on 15.2 percent of devices, but in April that declined to 14.3 percent.

Beyond that, Google's figures reveal that Android 3.0 Honeycomb stayed stagnant at 0.1 percent, Android 2.3.x Gingerbread slipped from 19 percent to 17.8 percent, and Android 2.2 Froyo lost 0.1 percent. µ

 

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