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Intel unveils $99 Bay Trail Minnowboard Max to rival Raspberry Pi

Updates Atom processor, shrinks size and slashes the price in half
Wed Apr 02 2014, 14:22

INTEL HAS SLASHED the price of its Linux-ready motherboard in an updated version named Minnowboard Max, which now boasts an Atom Processor and a much smaller footprint to rival the Raspberry Pi.

Built by Circuitco and backed by Intel's Minnowboard community, the Minnowboard Max will come in two versions when it's launched, sometime in June: a single core 1.46GHz Atom E3815 version with 1GB of DDR3 RAM for $99, and a dual-core 1.33GHz Atom E3825 version with 2GB of RAM for $129. UK prices are yet to be announced.

Intel MinnowBoard Max

Both Minnowboard Max models seem to support the full range of Bay Trail 22nm Atom E3800 processors, and both have Intel HD graphics on-die, with the E3815 chips clocked at 400MHz and the E3825 chips clocked at 533MHz.

"Minnowboard Max is a versatile, entry-level development option for IA embedded and product developers who need to reduce design and development costs by making modifications to the open hardware and software," Intel said in a news release. The firm also said it can run Android up to Android 4.4 Kitkat.

The Minnowboard Max is the next step up from the 32-bit Atom E640 $199 Minnowboard that Intel released last July.

As did its predecessor, the Minnowboard Max has two USB ports plus microSD and 10/100/1000 Ethernet, however the new version upgrades one of those USB ports from USB 2.0 to USB 3.0. A 3Gb/sec SATA connector is also included, and analogue audio has been replaced with a digital video and audio microHDMI connector.

Measuring 3.9x2.9in, the Minnowboard Max is also smaller than its 4.2in square predecessor, making it even more competitive with the Raspberri Pi. µ

 

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