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Apple seeks $2bn damages from Samsung as patents battle returns to court

Let the battle commence
Mon Mar 31 2014, 10:22
Apple iPhone fighting Samsung Galaxy SIII

BITTER RIVALS Apple and Samsung will return to court in California on Monday, with the firms set to kick off the latest round in their patents war.

From Monday 31 March, Apple and Samsung will argue before US District Court Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose.

This time, Apple is going after Samsung's newer Galaxy smartphone and tablet devices, including the Samsung Galaxy S3 and Samsung Galaxy Note 2, claiming that those models named infringe five of its patents.

The patents in question are US Patents: No. 5,946,547 - Data tapping; No. 6,847,959 - Unified search; No. 7,761,414 - Asynchronous data synchronization; No. 8,046,721 - Slide to unlock image; and No. 8,074,172 - Autocomplete.

If Apple is successful, it could be awarded up to $2bn in damages, with the firm apparently set to demand that Samsung pay it $40 in royalties per infringing device. According to Apple this figure is comparable to "real world deals," claiming that $40 is the figure the two companies would have settled on if a "perfectly rational negotiation" had taken place.

In court filings, Apple said, "Apple revolutionised the market in personal computing devices. Samsung, in contrast, has systematically copied Apple's innovative technology and products, features and designs, and has deluged markets with infringing devices."

Samsung has countered with claims that Apple infringes on its patented technology for data transmission, imaging, audio, and video in iPhone, iPad and iPod devices and Macintosh computers.

"Samsung has been a pioneer in the mobile device business sector since the inception of the mobile device industry," Samsung said. "Apple has copied many of Samsung's innovations in its Apple iPhone, iPod, and iPad products."

Keep an eye on The INQUIRER for all the latest in Apple and Samsung's patents war. µ

 

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