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Microsoft wants to improve reputations on Xbox One

Red means troll
Thu Mar 27 2014, 16:59
reputation-screenshot-xbox-microsoft

MICROSOFT HAS TURNED its attention to reputation on the Xbox One games console and has tweaked it to make people act a bit more social.

Reputation is built up over time and can depend on how your friends or other players relate to your gamesmanship. Behave like a dick and you might get a bad reputation, but if you play nice you should find it easier to slot into multiplayer games.

Michael Dunn, programme manager on Xbox Live, has taken to the Microsoft blog to talk up its new reputation features and how you can use them to massage the virtual world view of your online character.

"Gaming has always been a social activity, and for Xbox One we redesigned the Xbox Live community-powered reputation system from Xbox 360 to help better inform players about their behavior in the community," said Dunn.

The Xbox PM said that a traffic light system will indicate where on a git scale other players lie, and Dunn said that Yellow, for Needs work, and Red, for Avoid me, will join Green, for Good player on user gamer cards. Depending, of course, on where your reputation falls.

The more you play, the more time you put in and the less git-like you are, the better online experience you should have. Dunn said that nice guy players that do not abuse those around them could be in line for rewards. Really bad players will have limited multiplayer options and no access to Twitch.

"The more hours you play fairly online without being reported as abusive by other players, the better your reputation will be. The algorithm looks to identify players that are repeatedly disruptive across the community on Xbox Live," said Dunn.

"The vast majority of players do not regularly receive feedback from other players and, thus, will stay at the 'Good Player' reputation level." µ

 

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