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Turkish court backs Twitter takedown turnaround

Block lacks real support
Thu Mar 27 2014, 10:32
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A TURKISH COURT has overturned the block on Twitter services, leaving Turkey's telecoms regulator to unblock the network.

Following an IP address block earlier this week, the Turkish court has ordered the suspension of services lifted. However, there is talk that this might take weeks.

While the court, from the Turkish capital Ankara, has legally approved the resumption of Twitter services, it is now down to the local telecoms authority to bring it back to life and it might not rush to it.

Rupert Colville, spokesman for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, joined the anti-blockade criticism earlier this week, saying that this was an extension of activities in the country that it does not like.

"As we stated on 14 February, we are concerned that legislative amendments adopted by the Turkish Parliament in the form of law no. 6518 allow Turkey's telecommunications authority to block websites without first seeking a court order," said Colville.

"The law, as it stands, appears to be incompatible with Turkey's international human rights obligations, in particular those related to freedom of expression and opinion and the right to privacy... As the General Assembly recently affirmed in November 2013, the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online."

The European Commission has a similar lack of sympathy for Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's apparent attempts to stifle social communications about his administration.

Twitter previously recommended a workaround for Turkish users to evade a DNS redirection and started a legal campaign earlier this week to get its internet service restored in Turkey. µ

 

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