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Technology firms oppose the Trans Pacific Partnership

29 firms write to US Senator Ron Wyden
Fri Mar 21 2014, 15:04
The internet is protesting a TPP fast track

INTERNET PROTEST GROUP Fight for the Future (FFTF) has rounded up 29 information technology firms to sign a letter that strongly opposes passage of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) international trade treaty.

The TPP is an arrangement that favours the desires of large multinational firms over anything else. While it is broadly supported by some industries and the US government, it also has its opponents.

29 opponents, including Duckduckgo, Boingboing, Fark, iFixit and Reddit have given their support to the FFTF campaign against the TPP treaty and gladly signed the message of opposition.

The largest issues with the proposed trade agreement are its proposals for handling copyright, privacy and patents, along with the fact that it has been negotiated in almost total secrecy.

The letter asks US Senator Ron Wyden not to allow shadowy parties to dictate internet rules, and warns that supporting the TPP would be against the public interest.

"We can only build a successful innovation policy framework - one that supports new ideas, products, and markets - if the process to design it is open and participatory. Unfortunately, the trade negotiation process has been anything but transparent. Our industry, and the users that we serve, need to be at the table from the beginning to design policies that serve more than the narrow commercial interests of the few large corporations who have been invited to participate," wrote the companies.

"We urge you not to pass any version of Fast Track or trade promotion authority, or approve any mechanism that would facilitate the passage of trade agreements containing digital copyright enforcement provisions designed in an opaque, closed-door process."

They ended the letter by saying that Senator Wyden, as chair of the US Senate Finance Committee, is in a position to keep the US at the forefront of innovation. µ

 

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