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Samsung Galaxy S5 woes continue as camera production issues reported

Android 4.4 Kitkat flagship could miss 11 April release date
Mon Mar 17 2014, 12:24
Samsung Galaxy S5 is IP67 certified

KOREAN PHONE MAKER Samsung's Galaxy S5 could face delays due to production issues plaguing its 16MP camera, Korean media have reported.

If online murmurs are anything to go by, the Samsung Galaxy S5 is having a difficult time ahead of its launch. The handset reportedly has faced delays due to issues with its fingerprint sensor, and a fire at a factory producing parts for the handset has put the Galaxy S5 11 April launch date into doubt.

Now Korean news website Etnews has reported that there are issues with the Galaxy S5's new camera, with lens production yield coming in between just 20 and 30 percent of the desired amount.

The Samsung Galaxy S5 features a 16MP camera that crams in more components than the 13MP sensor on the Galaxy S4. Etnews reported that this lens is being stuffed into a body that's the same size, and to do so the lens has been made thinner, which means it is more prone to defects.

"On a thin lens, even the slightest flaw results in a considerable optical distortion," the website's source said. "To make [a] plastic lens thinner, a more accurate mold technology is necessary."

Because of this, Samsung reportedly has not been able to start mass production of the Galaxy S5, despite the phone's release date now being less than a month away.

"To keep the Galaxy S5 production schedule, Samsung Electronics' purchasing officers are staying in lens suppliers' plants almost full-time, according to sources," the report added.

Samsung has yet to respond to our request for comment, but last week it told us that the Galaxy S5 was still on target for release on 11 April. µ

 

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