The Inquirer-Home

Facebook video ads will start cluttering up your News Feed

Auto-playing 15 second clips assault users
Fri Mar 14 2014, 09:53
facebook-mobile-blue

SOCIAL NETWORK Facebook has announced that video adverts will soon start cluttering up its users' News Feeds, following several months of testing.

Facebook first announced that video ads were coming last December, and yesterday it said that after a few months of testing the auto-playing 15 second clips will now begin appearing in users' News Feeds.

It's not all bad news, though, as Facebook said that the adverts will be rolling out to a limited number of people initially. The firm said in a blog post, "In December, we started testing Premium Video Ads as a way for advertisers to drive branding objectives on Facebook. Starting today, we're introducing these ads on Facebook with a select group of advertisers.

"We'll roll out Premium Video Ads slowly and monitor how people interact with them. This limited introduction allows us to concentrate our efforts on a smaller number of advertisers with high-quality campaigns to create the best possible experience on Facebook."

Thankfully, Facebook's auto-playing video adverts won't be unavoidable. The social network was keen to point out that while the ads will start playing automatically, they will be without sound unless a user wants to watch it, and will stop playing if a user scrolls past it.

"Each 15-second video ad will start playing without sound as it appears on screen and stop if people scroll past. If people tap the video, it will expand into a full-screen view and sound will start," Facebook explained.

There's also an option to disable video streaming when you're on a 3G or 4G connection, to ensure that the adverts don't eat into your data allowance. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Dead electronic devices to be banned on US-bound flights

Will the new rules banning uncharged devices be effective?