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LeBron James reacts to Samsung phone fail in considered, calm manner

Once he recalls his ambassador status
Thu Mar 13 2014, 14:02
Samsung Galaxy Note 3 with Android 4.3 Jelly Bean

AMERICAN SPORTS CELEBRITY LeBron James briefly flamed Korean hardware outfit Samsung on Twitter, before remembering that he has something of a relationship with it.

Business Insider reported that James took to Twitter to express his disappointment with his handset and its recent loss of his content and contacts.

"My phone just erased everything it had in it, and rebooted. One of the sickest feelings I've ever had in my life!!!" he said.

His fit of pique was brief, however, because the basketball star recalled that he works with Samsung and has a promotional relationship with it. He deleted that tweet and followed it up with something of an acknowledgement.

Explaining that he was shaking his head, he tweeted that he was wearing a "Why me?" face.

James has appeared in a few TV ads for Samsung and has been the poster boy for its outsized handset, the Galaxy Note.

Later, possibly after its people had spoken with his people, James added that he had been reunited with his content, and in a tweet, said, "Close call. Wheew! Got all my info back. Gamer! Lol."

Technology firms can sometimes play a dangerous game when they trust a celebrity as an ambassador for a product, particularly if a celebrity forgets that they are supposed to be using that one.

For example, Alicia Keys, a spokesperson for Blackberry, was found to have tweeted from her iPhone just a month after being appointed as the Canadian firm's global creative director.

Meanwhile, earlier this month Samsung infamously sponsored the Oscars only to have the most talked-about image from the event tweeted from an iPhone. µ

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