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Apple wants Samsung to pay $40 in patent royalties per Android device

Samsung smartphones and tablets might get more expensive
Thu Mar 13 2014, 11:12
Apple iPhone fighting Samsung Galaxy SIII

GADGET DESIGNER Apple wants rival Samsung to cough up $40 for every Android phone it sells that allegedly infringes on five of its patents.

This week a US judge this week ruled that Samsung must hand over $930m in damages to Apple, but denied Apple a ban on the company's smartphones. The two firms are set to return to court on 31 March, and this time the hearing will relate to five patents that Apple claims Samsung is infringing with its Galaxy devices.

These five patents in question are US Patents: No. 5,946,547 - Data tapping; No. 6,847,959 - Unified search; No. 7,761,414 - Asynchronous data synchronization; No. 8,046,721 - Slide to unlock image; and No. 8,074,172 - Autocomplete.

While the trial has yet to begin, a transcript of a January 23 hearing held by the US District Court uncovers how much Apple is expecting Samsung to pay in royalties. The faint-hearted among you might want to stop reading now, as Apple wants Samsung to hand over $40 for every Android smartphone or tablet sold that allegedly infringes the patents, or around $8 per patent.

In the transcript, Apple argued that $40 per unit in patent royalities is comparable to "real world deals", and said that it would make up the losses it has experienced due to Samsung allegedly having infringed a number of its patents.

The firm also said it believed that $40 is the figure the two companies would have settled on if a "perfectly rational negotiation" had taken place.

While it seems unlikely that Apple's wish will be granted, if Samsung is ordered to pay $40 for every Android device it sells, we can expect Samsung smartphones and tablets to get more expensive.

Neither Apple or Samsung has commented yet, but we'll likely hear more on 31 March. µ

 

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