The Inquirer-Home

Apple's iOS 7.1 throws up in-app purchase warnings

Looks to avoid more scoldings from angry mums and dads
Wed Mar 12 2014, 16:06

Apple iOS 7.1 shows in app purchase warningsSOFTWARE DEVELOPER Apple's recently released iOS 7.1 mobile operating system will show pop up warnings about in-app purchases, with the firm looking to further protect users following a recent expensive settlement with the FTC.

No doubt to avoid further expensive settlements or potential lawsuits from angry parents and skint gamers, Apple has added in-app payment warnings to iOS 7.1. It looks like the feature will be available globally, as we got the warning when picking up a bag of gold coins in Temple Run 2. All in the name of work, of course.

Now, when users running iOS 7.1 make an in-app purchase, they will be greeted with a pop-up message that reads, "You can now make additional purchases in any app for the next 15 minutes without reentering your password. To change this, tap Settings and go to Restrictions."

Tap OK and the message will disappear, leaving you free to carry on wasting cash on pretend donuts and cowboy outfits. Tap Settings, and you'll be taken to a screen where you can fiddle with in-app purchase restrictions or disable in-app purchases altogether.

Despite in-app purchases likely contributing to Apple's app revenues, the firm hasn't had much luck with them.

Back in 2011, Apple was sued by an angry father, who moaned that his kid had spent too much money on in-app crap and that Apple wasn't doing enough to stop it. From there, things snowballed with an additional 23 million customers complaining about in-app purchases and demanding cash back from the company.

In January, Apple settled the case with the FTC, which cost the company a cool $32.5m. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Blackberry completes restructuring process

Do you think Blackberry can bounce back to growth?