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Sony starts taking Xperia Z2 Tablet pre-orders ahead of 'late March' release

Will challenge the iPad Air this month
Tue Mar 11 2014, 13:33

JAPANESE HARDWARE MAKER Sony's Xperia Z2 Tablet has gone up for pre-order in the UK ahead of its release towards the end of March.

That's courtesy of Sony, which has started taking pre-orders for its recently launched Xperia Z2 Tablet. The firm is offering three different Xperia Z2 Tablet models - 16GB WiFi-only, 32GB WiFi-only and 16GB with 4G connectivity, which are priced at £399, £449, and £499, respectively. The firm is also chucking in a free charging dock with pre-orders that's worth around £40.

Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet in black and white

Sony is yet to announce a release date for the tablet, but has said that orders placed now will start shipping at the end of the month.

The Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet was unveiled at last month's Mobile World Congress (MWC) along with its flagship Xperia Z2 smartphone.

The tablet's standout feature, according to Sony, is its size, with the Xperia Z2 Tablet measuring just 6.4mm thick - thinner than Apple's iPad Air. Despite this, the tablet has a larger 10.1in HD 1080p screen powered by a quad-core 2.3GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 chip and Google's Android 4.4 Kitkat mobile operating system, which Sony has skinned in its own user interface.

Like its smartphone sibling, the Xperia Z2 Tablet is resistant against dust and water, although it doesn't quite match the smartphone's cameras, touting dual 8.1MP and 2MP sensors.

The Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet also features a microSD slot that supports up to 64GB of expanded storage, a 6,000mAh battery and an optional Bluetooth keyboard. Much like its iPad Air competitor, it will also be available in black and white versions. µ

 

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