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Twitter’s Vine does not want most of your adult content

Stick your six seconds of smut
Fri Mar 07 2014, 09:17
vine

MICROBLOGGING SERVICE Twitter is clamping down on sexual activities that people post on quick clip video app Vine.

Vine is the short form video system that Twitter operates. There from today skin shots, dinkles, boobs and bottoms presented in a sexual manner are unwanted content.

The firm revealed its naked flesh curtain in a blog post, saying that it is not a prudish decision but one that the firm has to make.

"We introduced Vine to make it easier for people to find, watch, create and share videos right from their mobile phones. As we've watched the community and your creativity grow and evolve, we've found that there's a very small percentage of videos that are not a good fit for our community. So we're making an update to our Rules and Terms of Service to prohibit explicit sexual content," it said.

"For more than 99 percent of our users, this doesn't really change anything. For the rest: we don't have a problem with explicit sexual content on the internet - we just prefer not to be the source of it."

Twitter produced a support article to explain what sort of material is unwanted, and Vine reckons that people should refer to it to see whether they ought to be offended by something.

Explicit material, we learn, includes "depictions of sex acts, nudity that is sexually provocative or in a sexual context, and graphic depictions of sexual arousal." Indulge in any of those skinanigans and you might find yourself locked out of Vine.

Flesh coloured activities that are allowed include breastfeeding, arty things, and clothed, but rather sexy dancing.

Vine was not around very long before it had its first pornography scandal. In January last year a collection of hardcore clips was selected as an Editor's Choice... briefly.

Twitter reckons that its decision to ban porn will affect one percent of its users. µ

 

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