The Inquirer-Home

Apple reportedly approves full-screen video ads on iPhones and iPads

Good for developers, bad for consumers
Thu Mar 06 2014, 10:48
Apple iPad Air and iPad Mini with Retina display

SOFTWARE DEVELOPER Apple reportedly is planning to show full-screen video adverts to iPhone and iPad users, no doubt to boost its advertising revenues.

While Apple allows some full-screen video ads on free iPad games such as Uno and Draw Something, users usually have to click on an advertiser's banner to view an annoying video ad. However, that could be about to change, with Apple reportedly having given the thumbs up to full-screen video adverts on iOS.

That's according to Adage, which has heard from people familiar with the matter that Apple will soon allow developers to shove full screen iAds into the faces of iOS users.

The report claims that Apple won't allow these full-screen videos to interrupt something users are doing within an app or game, but rather will be slotted into transitional screens - such as between a game's levels or after you've finished reading an article. That's the hope, at least.

Beyond that, there's no further information about Apple's revamped iAds scheme, although the report said it's likely to launch later this year. It's still unclear how much Apple will charge advertisers and developers.

This shift is likely a move by Apple to increase the revenue it gets from its iAds service, which since its launch in 2010 has been regarded as a bit of a failure due to its high advertising rates. For example, Apple's iAds service brought in advertising income of just $125 million in 2012, which is around half what Google raked in with its Admob service.

It also sees the Cupertino firm offering advertisers and developers another way to monetise their services, likely as an attempt to keep them loyal to iOS.

Apple has yet to comment on the report. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?