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Ministry of Sound and Spotify settle playlist court case

Settled out of court
Fri Feb 28 2014, 12:42
two businesspeople shaking hands

MUSIC BUSINESSES OLD AND NEW Ministry of Sound and Spotify have settled their legal dispute over online playlists.

Ministry of Sound, a nightclub and compilation album company, sued Spotify last year in an attempt to get the music streaming firm to take down playlists that allegedly copied its compilations.

As the firm launched its lawsuit, Ministry of Sound CEO Lohan Presencer told the Guardian that it was fed up with meeting a brick wall at Spotify.

"[We] contacted the company to request it remove the offending playlists. It declined, claiming there was no infringement and it wasn't its responsibility to police its users," he said.

"Several rounds of legal letters later, this dispute will now be settled in court. We believe we have a clear cut case. After 20 years and more than 50 million album sales, the value and creativity in our compilations are self evident. Until now, we've watched Spotify's progress from a distance. But we can no longer remain silent. This so-called saviour of the industry and enemy of the pirates is allowing our compilations to be used without permission and refusing to take action when told about the problem."

Today that dispute has been settled and the firms have released a joint statement that closes the playlist episode amicably. The statement does not mention what resolution is in place, but does see both parties confirming the accord.

"Ministry of Sound welcomes Spotify's willingness to work together to reach an agreement," said Presencer. "Spotify and Ministry of Sound are pleased to have reached a resolution on amicable terms," added James Duffett-Smith, head of licensing business affairs at Spotify.

The Guardian reported that Spotify will not remove the playlists, but they will not be searchable. µ

 

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