The Inquirer-Home

London's 22.7Mbps top mobile data speed puts New York's 13.9Mbps to shame

But Toronto goes faster still
Wed Feb 26 2014, 16:01
city-of-london-1

LONDON MOBILE DATA BANDWIDTH is faster than mobile data services in New York, but it lags a long way behind data speeds in Toronto.

The latest figures compiled by Rootmetrics, a network statistics company that has just celebrated its 800 millionth sample, has revealed that EE is the fastest UK network with an average combined 3G and 4G figure of 22.7Mbps. This is a significant increase from the last survey in which EE averaged 17.3Mbps.

With average London fixed line broadband speeds presently standing at 14.7Mbps, according to Ofcom statistics, the mobile companies have plenty to smile about, with 02 clocking 16.3Mbps and Vodafone 16.2Mbps.

Meanwhile in New York, Verizon, the company at the centre of the ongoing net neutrality row, clocked the fastest speeds, which were significantly lower at 13.9Mbps. The other networks were comparable, apart from Sprint, which suffered from the combination of a fledgling LTE network and customers on a number of different protocols, including CDMA and Wimax. As a result it could muster only a measly 3.7Mbps.

However, if you want a really fast mobile internet, it seems that Toronto in Canada is your destination of choice. The lowest score there was seen from Bell at a healthy 19.3Mbps, but paled into the background compared to 33Mbps from Rogers.

Mobile data is in a state of flux at present with 4G networks still in the process of being rolled out, and many subscribers still on the ageing 2G and 3G networks. However with firms such as Three and Tesco offering unlimited data plans on 4G at no extra charge, the demands on the 4G infrastructure will continue to rise, and it remains to be seen if the networks have been future-proofed enough to keep up.

Manufacturers already have their sights set on 5G, with Huaweipredicting speeds of 10Gbps by 2020. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?