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Nvidia eyes AMD with Maxwell powered Geforce GTX 750 and GTX 750Ti GPUs

Low power makes them perfect for Steam OS
Tue Feb 18 2014, 16:18

CHIP DESIGNER Nvidia has announced a range of mid-range GPUs based on its Maxwell graphics chip architecture.

The firm claims that the Geforce GTX 750 and GTX 750Ti GPUs are 50 percent faster than their predecessors that were based on the Kepler architecture.

As well as the boost in speed, Nvidia's new GPUs are said to be more than twice as efficient, with a 135 percent performance boost per core.

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The news confirms rumours and leaks of specifications for the new products that appeared earlier this month.

The top of the range GTX 750Ti has 640 Cuda cores, a memory speed of 5.4Gbps and a choice of 1GB or 2GB of GDDR5 RAM. It is rated at only 60W power draw and is priced at £114.99 for the 2GB model.

Although this announcement will please present PC gamers, the lightweight, low power GPUs likely will also win fans among the new breed of Steam OS users. The GPU cards do not require dedicated power connectors and measure a mere 5.7in long, radiating relatively little heat or noise.

"Nvidia understands that delivering a [next generation] gaming experience means a lot more than cranking up the clocks, heat and noise just to eke out a few extra frames per second," said Nvidia SVP of content and technology Tony Tamasi.

"Our Gameworks technologies, combined with the performance, power efficiency and cool and quiet operation of the GTX 750 Ti and 750, dramatically change the way gamers can play."

Both GPU models are available now, but Nvidia has already hinted that these mid-range graphics cards are just the beginning for the Maxwell line of GPU chips and that there are more announcements on the way. µ

 

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