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Microsoft kicks off a week of Xbox 360 game price cuts

It’s half term after all
Tue Feb 18 2014, 15:04
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GAMES CONSOLE MAKER Microsoft is cutting the prices of Xbox 360 games during half term week.

The firm announced cheap title deals that last for one day and has revealed cuts to prices for games including Halo: Reach and Dishonored.

"For those of you looking to fill these cold, snowy late-Winter days with games, this is your week: the Xbox 360 Ultimate Games Sale kicks off... NOW," said Microsoft in a blog post on Monday.

"For the next seven days, we'll be slashing prices on some of Xbox 360's best titles, and these are in addition to this week's normal games and add-on deals on the Xbox Games Store (which will be revealed tomorrow morning)."

The list of discounted game titles includes eight games, and users have only a limited time to take advantage of the price cuts. Price reductions vary across the titles, and the largest discount is on a game called Bastion. Its price is reduced by 80 percent.

Halo Reach is just a quarter of its old price and Dishonored is discounted by two-thirds. The rest of the list includes Dante's Inferno, Armored Core: Verdict Day, Ruse, Capcom Arcade Cabinet and Runner 2: Future Legend of Rhythm Alien. All of the games' prices are reduced by at least 63 percent. But remember, time is ticking.

This week the Xbox One studio manager tweeted that Microsoft will be experimenting with the prices of digital games. "Lot of people asked for better deals on our digital marketplace, so we're testing some," he said. At the same time the firm announced a discounted digital copy of Ryse: Son of Rome.

Slower moving punters might take their time and take advantage of a range of other deals on other titles including Portal 2 and Mass Effect. The discounts are similar, but those deals last until 25 February. µ

 

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