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BBC Radio 1 pop charts to include Spotify streaming plays

Streamers rub shoulders with digital sales
Tue Feb 18 2014, 13:29
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THE HEAD OF MUSIC at BBC Radio 1 has revealed that music plays on streaming services such as Spotify will count towards its pop music charts.

The announcement was made by George Ergatoudis at an event in London called "Radio Academy Playlists: What Makes a Hit in 2014?"

Ergatoudis clarified his statement on Twitter after initial reports suggested that only plays on Spotify will be counted. "Not just Spotify, other music streaming services will be included," he said.

Last year what made hits were questions about how foxes communicate and something called twerking.

Then, and we presume going into 2014, music buyers were increasingly digitally motivated. At the start of 2013 99 percent of music single sales were digital.

"2012 was an encouraging year for UK artists and for music's digital future. Digital albums grew strongly and singles sales hit a new record. [But] market conditions at home remained difficult and pressure on the 'leisure wallet' impacted music sales on the high street," said British Phonographic Industry (BPI) chief executive Geoff Taylor then.

By the beginning of this year BPI announced that local streaming revenues had broken through the 100 million barrier, and premium account subscribers were said to be accounting for 10 percent of the value of recorded music sales.

The UK's present number one single is called Rather Be by Clean Bandit, featuring Jess Glynne. At number five is a song called Crying for No Reason. We suspect that the composer had a rather good reason, and that is because they listened to songs one thru four.

In the US digital streams already count towards single sales tables and have since the late 2000s. Late last year Billboard broke down the mix that makes up its pop music chart. It said that streams account for between 20 and 30 percent of its numbers and that sales and airplay represent 45 and 40 percent, respectively.

Billboard also counts Youtube plays, which BPI suggested would improve the UK picture too. µ

 

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