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Apple and Google crack the whip on Flappy Bird clones

No more ripoffs allowed
Mon Feb 17 2014, 10:02
Flappy Bird for iOS and Android

SOFTWARE MERCHANDISERS Apple and Google are cracking down on Flappy Bird clones, following the popular game app's shockingly sudden demise last week.

That's according to The Verge, which has heard from a number of app developers that both Apple and Google are cracking down on apps blatantly cashing in on Flappy Bird. While clones such as Splashy Fish are still showing up at the top of the iTunes Store, developers have told the news website that no new Flappy Bird ripoffs are being allowed on either the iTunes App Store or Google Play store.

Ken Carpenter, developer of an app called Flappy Dragon, tweeted about his experience after Apple told him that it had not been approved.

That's not just because it's got the word "Flappy" in the title, as Apple explained that the app was rejected both because of its name and the fact that it attempted to cash-in on Flappy Bird's demise.

Apple said, "We found that your app, and/or its metadata, contains content that could be misleading to users, which is not in compliance with the App Store Review Guidelines. We found your app name attempts to leverage a popular app."

Carpenter has managed to get his app accepted on the Google Play store by changing its name to Derpy Dragon after it was at first rejected by the firm.

Speaking of his experience trying to get the app on Android, he said, "The first time I assumed it was because I included a phrase about Flappy Dragon being the best flapping game to play now that 'Flappy Bird' is dead. My app was originally published with no issue and was online and searchable for a few hours."

Google has yet to comment on the matter.

Apparently it hasn't been just Flappy Dragon that has fell victim to Apple's and Google's new guidelines. Flappy Bee's developer likely got slapped on the wrists, with the app now showing up as Jumpy Bee, while Flappy Machines is nowhere to be seen. µ

 

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