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Microsoft’s Xbox starts to move towards real currency

Pointless points pushed out on 1 March
Thu Feb 13 2014, 13:40
Bag of money

GAMES CONSOLE MAKER Microsoft is closing in the end of its Xbox based Points currency.

Points is a games console based currency that acts as a bridge between what something costs in the real world and its cost in the online world. For example, while something might cost £5.99 in a shop, it could cost a seemingly unrelated 800 points online.

Points are purchased through an Xbox games console via gift cards. They can be used to buy games and video content through apps, game add-ons, wallpapers and other crap, and the ability to change your avatar name.

A 1,200 point card will set you back £9.99. The prices scale up and down accordingly, so 4,200 points can cost around £33 and 400 points, £3.50.

Microsoft has started emailing users about the end of Points, having already said it planned to shut down Points last year.

"As early as March 1, 2014 we'll add to your Microsoft account an amount of currency equal to or greater than the Xbox stores value of your Microsoft Points, and your Microsoft Points will be retired," explained the firm in an email.

"You'll immediately be able to use your new funds, in addition to other current payment methods available in your region, to purchase a variety of content on your Xbox 360 or Xbox One, the Windows Store on a Windows 8.1 tablet or PC, and the Windows Phone Store on a Windows Phone 8."

Existing gift cards will be supported, as Microsoft said that it has no immediate intention of not honouring them, but it will be moving away from them.

Under the new system users will be asked if they want to add a real currency credit to their account. If they approve this, they will be able to spend their hard-earned cash on new bear ears for their avatar. Or something. µ

 

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