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Twitter takes tips from Facebook for profile redesign

Twitter is testing a major redesign that looks a lot like its rival social network
Wed Feb 12 2014, 09:51

MICROBLOGGING WEBSITE Twitter is testing a profile design that looks a lot like rival website Facebook.

The design overhaul with spotted by Mashable's Matt Petronzio, who noticed that his Twitter profile had undergone a major revamp on Tuesday.

The profile redesign sees Twitter taking tips from rival social networks Facebook and Google+, with the main picture and bio shifted to the left of the page with more space dedicated to the header photo, which now sits across the top of the screen.

Twitter's profile redesign looks like Facebook

The tweet stream has also seen a major re-jig, with Twitter placing a greater emphasis on images and content cards. Tweets are no longer presented in list form, with the firm moving away from a vertical timeline in favour of a Facebook style alternative.

The redesign also adds a new category under the header for photo and video content.

Twitter declined to comment on the leak, but has previously said in a blog post that it is constantly rolling out changes ot the website that might not always be visible to all.

Twitter's VP of engineering said back in September, "We are constantly evolving the product. Some changes are visible - they may help you protect your Twitter account or make it easier to share photos; others are under-the-hood changes that help us suggest relevant content in real time and make Twitter more engaging."

It's unclear when the redesigned profile will appear to all users, but Twitter commonly rolls out its new features to a handful of users before making them widely available. Given that Twitter's Timeline revamp has only just rolled out to all users, we might have to wait a while. µ

 

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