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Virgin Atlantic puts on Google Glass goggles

Pilot scheme for premium punters at Heathrow airport
Tue Feb 11 2014, 00:05
virgin-atlantic-google-glass

BRITISH AIRLINE Virgin Atlantic is greeting flight arrivals at Heathrow today with ground staff wearing Google Glass.

The firm will scan its Upper Class customers right from the moment they exit their fancy cars.

Virgin Atlantic said that the spectacles will help its staff check in travelers on arrival and let its hand wringers greet them by name and let them know the status of their expected flights. Other information, such as dietary requirements will also be provided.

It will be a six-week pilot scheme and Virgin Atlantic expects to continue with it, and it is just one of many advances that the firm has adopted.

"While it's fantastic that more people can now fly than ever before, the fact that air travel has become so accessible has led to some of the sheen being lost for many passengers", breezed Virgin Atlantic director of IT Dave Bulman.

"By being the first in the industry to test how Google Glass and other wearable technology can improve customer experience, we are upholding Virgin Atlantic's long tradition of shaking things up and putting innovation at the heart of the flying experience."

Virgin polled people on what they like and don't like about flying. It found that a lot of things that it has or is doing are the kinds of things that people like.

"Many of our passengers now use their mobiles on board, particularly to send emails or check Facebook. We continue to look ahead and research innovations that customers might only dream of today," added Bulman.

"The whole industry needs to listen to what these passengers are calling for, and keep innovating to bring a return to the golden age of air travel. Flying should be a pleasure not a chore." µ

 

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