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HTC and Nokia end legal spat with patents agreement

All litigation between the companies is dismissed
Mon Feb 10 2014, 10:08
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RIVAL PHONE MAKERS HTC and Nokia announced over the weekend that they have reached a patents agreement that will end ongoing litigation between the two companies.

Full terms of the agreement have not been revealed, but Nokia said in a press release that HTC will pay an undisclosed sum for patents licensing. HTC already pays Nokia for access to its standards essentials mobile patents, so this deal likely covers the rest of the Finnish phone firm's patents portfolio.

What we do know, however, is that this agreement will end the recent lawsuit between the two companies, which saw Nokia alleging that HTC infringed its EP0998024 patent, described as a "modular structure for a transmitter and a mobile station". This saw Nokia awarded a ban on the Taiwanese firm's HTC One Mini and One Max handsets, albeit briefly, and taking the legal action to courts in other European countries.

The agreement between HTC and Nokia also involves HTC's LTE patents portfolio, which Nokia said will further strengthen its mobile patents licensing position.

Nokia chief intellectual property officer Paul Melin said in a statement, "We are very pleased to have reached a settlement and collaboration agreement with HTC, which is a long standing licensee for Nokia's standards essential patents.

"This agreement validates Nokia's implementation patents and enables us to focus on further licensing opportunities."

HTC general counsel Grace Lei added, "Nokia has one of the most preeminent patent portfolios in the industry.

"As an industry pioneer in smartphones with a strong patent portfolio, HTC is pleased to come to this agreement, which will enable us to stay focused on innovation for consumers." µ

 

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