The Inquirer-Home

Apple looks into iris scanning for iPhone 6, while Samsung points the finger

The luck of the iris
Tue Jan 21 2014, 12:55
eye-keyhole

GADGET DESIGNER Apple has become the latest phone maker to set its sights on eye scanning technology.

The company has hired a number of key workers from the medical research field to accelerate its research into wearable technology, much of which mirrors work done by its competitors.

Once such example is Nancy Dougherty, who was plucked from her job at Sano Intelligence, the designer of a non-invasive sticker that is able to assess blood chemistry and transmit the data to a receiving device. This echoes Google's recent announcement of a contact lens that analyses blood through tears.

The website 9to5mac also cites sources that claim Apple is working on its own iris scanner technology to rival that of Samsung, which has been rumoured to be considering this for the upcoming Galaxy S5.

However The Korea Herald has reported that Samsung has decided to wait and hone its eye scanning technology and has instead optedfor fingerprint scanning, but using the touchscreen rather than a separate sensor, a technology that Apple is said to be working on too. The pupil might have become the master.

Sorry. That was one of our cornea jokes.

The frustrating part about all this is the silo culture that has arisen in the industry. Both Apple and Samsung clearly are working on wearable biometric technology designed to improve the lives of those with serious medical conditions.

Yet, by working in isolation they are foregoing progress that could benefit people, placing their priorities instead on gaining all of the glory and profits. Surely, when it comes to medical science, these two giants might consider their moral reponsibilities and put their fierce competitiveness aside. µ

 

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