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Syrian Electronic Army attacks Saudi websites

Also promises a return to Redmond
Thu Jan 16 2014, 13:37
Security threats - password theft

POLITICAL HACKTIVIST GROUP the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) has struck a number of Saudi Arabian government websites and seized control of their domains.

This is what the SEA does. It attacks websites through phishing campaigns and social engineering. It is pretty good at it and regularly claims successful attacks on some big companies.

Last week it took on Microsoft and took control of two twitter accounts and a blog, and it has attacked many other victims previously.

Last night the SEA devoted its attentions and its twitter feed to news about the fallen Saudi websites, calling out each one of them as it took control. It also released a Pastebin document that lists all of the plundered domains.

We have checked a number of them and we couldn't find any that would take us any further than a "Problem loading page" message. The Pastebin document lists 17 hacked domains.

Each of the Twitter posts includes the hashtag #ActAgainstSaudiArabiaTerrorism, and previously each of the presently unavailable websites redirected to the same webpage, which includes a message that follows those lines.

Last week when it hit Microsoft the SEA managed to make its way into the firm's internal email servers and watched in real time as it reacted to its Twitter takeover.

Today in a new message it promised that it is not done with Microsoft and will be coming back to pay it some more attention.

Last week Microsoft acknowledged the intrusion. "Microsoft is aware of targeted cyberattacks that temporarily affected the Xbox Support and Microsoft News Twitter accounts," said a spokesperson then. "The accounts were quickly reset and we can confirm that no customer information was compromised." µ

 

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