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Nvidia Tegra K1 smashes Apple and Qualcomm in early benchmarks

Outperforms all comers with a fraction of the power draw
Mon Jan 13 2014, 16:54
Nvidia shows off Tegra K1 processor at CES promising major performance boost

EARLY BENCHMARKS are emerging that show that the recently unveiled Nvidia Tegra K1 system on chip (SoC) processor seems be the fastest thing since greased lightning.

Established tinkering website Tom's Hardware was given access to a Lenovo Thinkvision 28 all in one (AIO) system that had a Tegra K1 prototype in it, and found that it outperformed everything, not only in its class, but any portable machines put up against it.

It benchmarked a staggering 48fps in graphics testing, against a still impressive 38fps from Apple's A7 processor, and scored 25 percent higher in 3D Mark graphics and physics tests.

Given that the A7 outperforms its other big rival, the Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 processor, it does appear that there is a new performance leader in the industry that has set the benchmark for other chip designers very high.

What makes this all the more impressive is that this chip uses a fraction of the power draw of traditional processors, making it suitable for portable devices including smartphones and tablets. The Thinkvision 28 AIO registered the four cores as running at 2.0GHz, which is lower than the 2.3GHz quoted by Nvidia, suggesting that the chip is capable of even higher performance.

Although it isn't due for release until later in the year, manufacturers have already started expressing interest in the Tegra K1 SoC, most notably Microsoft, which is rumoured to be lining up the Tegra K1 to power its third generation Surface tablets.

With 192 GPU cores, the Tegra K1 was always going to be very powerful processor. However, these results suggest that this summer might see some really game-changing products brought to market. µ 

 

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