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Google’s Schaft wins robot battle trials

They say this cat is a bad mother...
Mon Dec 23 2013, 10:37
A robot

SEARCH AND ADVERTISING FIRM Google has a robot-dominating-robot called Schaft in its roster.

The firm offered Schaft as its entry to a DARPA robot Olympics, a video of which is embedded below, and it has dominated the early stages of the event.

The two legged private dick, that's a hit with all the clicks - sorry, thats a different Shaft entirely - swaggered ahead of the competition, with its large square head, and robotic manner.

In case he ever rounds a corner and comes at you, you should know that Schaft is a rescue robot, so [he] is not as frightening as he looks. In the video he is shown performing suitable tasks such as using a fire hose and walking up a ladder.

DARPA, though, is the branch of the US Department of Defense responsible for developing breakthrough technologies for the military.

According to a report on Space.com, Schaft is a Japanese creation, and the company that built it is owned by Google, which has had a spending spree in that direction in the past few weeks.

Space.com said that Schaft dominated the competition, the next stage of which is the finals. The finals are expected to be held in about 12 to 18 months.

Google picked up a range of dystopian-looking pet machines when it took on the firm Boston Dynamics. Included in its e-kennels are creatures like Cheetah, a robot that can run at 29 miles per hour, and something called Big Dog - that you may want to run away from.

"We will show the world what's possible, what we need to work on, what it's really going to take for robots to step up when disaster strikes," said DARPA director Arati Prabhakar at the event.

"The teams here today will help people see a better future with robotic capabilities and not just see it, but help build it." µ

 

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