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Twitter troll suspects plead guilty

Updated Will be sentenced later
Tue Jan 07 2014, 15:30
Image of a horrible online troll at a computer

TWO UK SUSPECTS who were arrested last year for sending offensive tweets have pleaded guilty to the charges.

The man and woman attended a hearing on Tuesday where they pleaded guilty to all the charges. They will be sentenced at a later date.

The two alleged trolls were charged with "improper use of a communications network" after a complaint received by Caroline Criado-Perez about threats she received on Twitter.

Isabella Sorley, 23, from Newcastle and John Nimmon, 25, from South Shields allegedly sent the tweets to Criado-Perez, a feminist campaigner, in response to a successful campaign to have author Jane Austen immortalised on the reverse of the  10 pound note.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is still investigating another suspect in the case about whom no decision has been made. A further two suspects will not be charged. Miss Criado-Perez along with MP Stella Creasy received a barrage of tweets, some of them of a violent sexual nature over the course of the campaign.

She told the BBC that after the Bank of England announced its decision she received "about 50 abusive tweets an hour for about 12 hours" and said that she had "stumbled into a nest of men who co-ordinate attacks on women".

Twitter was called on to act in the wake of the tweets and responded by introducing new measures making it easier for users to report abuse.

Twitter was also previously forced to reverse a policy change that saw blocked users able to continue to see tweets and interact with users who had blocked them. The outcry following the announcement of the decision was such that Twitter changed its mind within 24 hours. µ

 

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