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Microsoft reportedly offers Samsung $1bn to make more Windows Phones

It could be all change if someone left the Windows open
Fri Dec 13 2013, 15:18
Samsung ATIV Windows Phone 8 device slanted

PATENT BATTLING PHONE MAKER Samsung is being courted by Microsoft to re-adopt Windows Phone with a deal said to be worth $1bn.

Just days after it was revealed that almost Microsoft-owned Nokia is pressing ahead with an Android handset, it now appears that the ailing software giant wants the biggest seller of Android smartphones to work its magic on Windows Phone.

Although Samsung has kept its finger in both pies over the years, it has been Android that has been both the priority and biggest success for the company, partly due to its open source nature keeping costs down. Samsung's last Windows Phone release was the Ativ S smartphone, which debuted back in October 2012.

But now, according to a Russian blogger, Microsoft is courting Samsung to remain a partner in the Windows Phone ecosystem with a $1bn investment. This represents a deal similar to the $250m per quarter that the company offered to Nokia as it moved away from Symbian to Windows Phone.

Although the deal is far from certain, if this information does turn out to be accurate it would represent an escape route for Samsung, which despite making billions in profit from Android powered smart devices has also been plagued by damages and legal costs around the world due to its ongoing patent battles with Apple.

At present Samsung has no plans to release a new Windows Phone handset, but with further reports that Microsoft plans to drop software licensing fees for Windows Phone, for the first time Microsoft appears to be making a serious attempt to court major phone makers away from Google's mobile operating system. µ

 

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