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Google Street View makes travel easier by mapping airports and train stations

Let's you roam around 16 international airports and over 50 train stations
Tue Nov 26 2013, 10:56

WORLD MAPPING SERVICE Google has rolled out an update to Google Maps that allows Street View to take users inside some of the world's major airports and train stations.

Google's first efforts to map global transit locations include 16 international airports, over 50 train and subway stations and even a cable car station in Hong Kong. The firm said the updates will "cut the stress of travelling" by giving users a preview of their journey.

London Waterloo station Google Maps Street View

"Now you can visit the check-in counter of your airline in Madrid, map out the way from baggage claim to the bus at Tokyo International Airport and check out where to pick up your rental car at Eindhoven Airport; you can even scope out your seat on an Emirates flight from Dubai," wrote Google Street View programme manager Ulf Spitzer in a blog post.

The addition allows travellers to get an idea of what to expect from a certain train station or airport before travelling so they have a better understanding of where to go when the times comes to navigate around a new place, which should make it both quicker and less stressful.

Is there anything that Google won't map? Earlier this month, Google even mapped a British cold war era submarine, the first submersible to be featured on the website. Offering a virtual tour of a submarine, Google's Street View cameras have mapped out the interior of the retired HMS Ocelot, giving viewers a glimpse inside.

Last month, the internet giant also documented a 30 mile stretch of the river Thames using Street View cameras, offering 360 degree views of the surrounding area. The Thames is the first European river to be fully mapped for Google Maps. µ

 

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