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Mark Zuckerberg counsels US government on snooping

Says it is doing it all wrong
Mon Nov 25 2013, 15:58
mark-zuckerberg

HOODY WEARING GAZILLIONAIRE Mark Zuckerberg has criticised the US National Security Agency (NSA) and its surveillance methods, saying that it "blew it".

Zuckerberg gave the world Facebook, and knows a thing or two about snarfing up and using data. It seems that he thinks that the US government does not, and has has given it a 'middling, should try harder' score.

"You know, I certainly think that we all want national security. We want to live in a safe country and we want to be protected from risks," he said in an interview with ABC's The Week. His comments come deep down in the transcript, so you may want to do a search on the page for them, or read the whole thing.

"I think that these things are always a balance. In terms of doing the right things and also being clear and telling people about what you're doing. I think the government really blew it on this one. And I honestly think that they're continuing to blow it in some ways and I hope that they become more transparent in that part of it."

The young Zuckerberg acknowledges that it is easy to make mistakes, and some might say that Facebook has made some.

He admitted that too, in a response to a questions about the failings of a new national healthcare system in the US.

He said, "You know, sometimes stuff doesn't work when you want it to. We've certainly had plenty of mistakes and things that haven't worked the way that we want to. The right thing here is just to keep on focusing on building the service that you think is right in the long term."

Facebook has already complained about not being able to talk about the NSA and snooping. It is also pursuing its right to speak up about snooping, and be as transparent as possible. µ

 

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