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AMD announces 'industry's first' 12GB supercomputing server graphics card

Firepro S10000 12GB GPU is for big data high performance computing
Fri Nov 15 2013, 16:43
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CHIP DESIGNER AMD has announced a 12GB version of its Firepro S10000 graphics processing unit (GPU) designed for big data high performance computing (HPC) workloads, in what firm says is the "industry's first supercomputing server graphics card".

The Firepro S10000 12GB GPU features ECC memory plus DirectGMA support, which the company said allows developers working with large models and assemblies to use parallel processing capabilities of AMD GPUs, which are based on the AMD's Graphics Core Next (GCN) architecture.

The Firepro S10000 is targeted for use in visualisation servers in industries such as design and engineering, geophysics, life sciences, medicine and defense. It can also be used in double precision and single precision environments in industries such as genetic sequencing, computational fluid dynamics seismic processing, molecular dynamics and satellite imaging, for example.

It could even be used in ultra high end workstations for GPU compute and 3D graphics performance in computer aided engineering applications.

"Our compute application customers asked for a solution that offers increased memory to support larger data sets as they create new products and services," said AMD senior director of professional graphics David Cummings. "In response, we're announcing the AMD Firepro S10000 12GB Edition graphics card to meet that additional memory demand with support for OpenCL and high-end compute and graphics technologies."

AMD Firepro S10000 12GB Edition GPU will include full support for PCI Express 3.0 and for use with the OpenCL compute programming language. It should be available some time next spring, AMD said. µ

 

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