The Inquirer-Home

Nokia wins patent case against HTC in the UK, will seek HTC One ban

Updated UK High Court sways in Finns' favour
Wed Oct 30 2013, 15:19
HTC One Mini features a 4.3in screen

FINNISH PHONE MAKER Nokia has won a patent case against HTC in the UK High Court, and will seek a ban on the HTC One smartphone.

Nokia's legal victory saw the UK High Court rule on Wednesday that Nokia's EP0998024 patent, described as a "modular structure for a transmitter and a mobile station", is valid, despite challenge from HTC.

This is bad news for the Taiwanese phone maker, as its flagship HTC One smartphone that incorporates certain Qualcomm and Broadcom chips, as well as handful of older HTC devices, infringes the patent.

Thanks to its court win on Wednesday, Nokia said that it will seek a UK ban on the HTC One smartphone along with other infringing devices, as well as financial compensation.

In a statement, Nokia's Mark Durrant told The INQUIRER, "Nokia is pleased that the UK High Court has today confirmed the validity of Nokia patent EP 0 998 024 and ruled that a number of HTC products, including the HTC One, infringe this patent.

"Today's judgment is a significant development in our dispute with HTC. Nokia will now seek an injunction against the import and sale of infringing HTC products in the UK as well as financial compensation.

"Local counterparts of this patent are already in suit against HTC in Germany, Italy, Japan and the US. This is the third court this year to find that HTC infringes Nokia patents, bringing the number of patents found infringed to four."

HTC, understandably, isn't too pleased, and has said it will appeal the ruling. A spokesperson for the company told us, "Naturally HTC is disappointed by the decision that the UK court has reached in this case and we will be seeking to appeal the finding immediately. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?