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Boffins prove you don't need two eyes for 3D

It's just a question of perspective
Mon Oct 14 2013, 15:55
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THERE'S GREAT NEWS for the visually impaired: the University of St Andrews now believes that it is possible to see in three dimensions with only one eye.

The research published in Psychological Science goes beyond those with ocular disorders and pirates with eyepatches, as it could lead to cheaper implementation of 3D in phones and games consoles, as well as the holy grail of glasses free 3D.

Dr Dhanraj Vishwanath of the university said, "We have demonstrated experimentally for the first time that the same 'special way' in which depth is experienced in 3D movies can also be experienced by looking at a normal picture with one eye viewing through a small aperture."

This is the first time since stereoscoping 3D techniques were perfected in the last century that the premise of what causes depth perception has changed. It could even lead to those with medical conditions such as Strabismics - reckoned to be around 15 percent of the population - to experience 3D vision for the first time.

From a technological perspective, the same principles Dr Vishwanath believes will mean that higher resolution pictures, such as the forthcoming 4K format, could be enough to create glassesless 3D programming in their own right and that increased resolution could be enough to achieve a perception of depth.

It is widely accepted that 3D vision is an acquired skill as part of child development, and therefore that people with misaligned or missing eyes could not therefore learn the skill as they didn't have the "right equipment".

This research seems to suggest that, the brain can adapt to work with what it has available, showing yet again that the human brain is the greatest computer of all. µ

 

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