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Facebook rejects privacy, says users can no longer remain anonymous in search

It might be time to delete your account
Fri Oct 11 2013, 13:11
mark-zuckerberg

SOCIAL NETWORK Facebook has irked its users once again by removing the ability for people to remain anonymous in searches on the website.

Facebook, or 'Faceboot' as The INQUIRER team prefers, announced that it was removing the "Who can look up your Timeline by name?" feature on Thursday. This feature had allowed users to remain anonymous in search - and with the most secure setting switched on, users could ensure that people typing their name would not see that they had an account on the website.

Now, users can run, but they can no longer hide. The removal of the feature means that all users will show up in search results, even if the search is being carried out by a stalker or admirer. This essentially means that anybody searching for your name will be able to see that you have a Facebook account.

Trying to defend the decision, Facebook said the security feature made the website "feel broken" at times. A spokesperson for the social network said, "People told us that they found it confusing when they tried looking for someone who they knew personally and couldn't find them in search results, or when two people were in a Facebook Group and then couldn't find each other through search."

It added that users can still choose what they want to share with others, and that users can limit the audience that they share posts with.

Facebook's spokesperson added, "To quickly control who can find posts you shared in the past, visit the privacy settings page. With one click, you can limit the audience of posts you've shared in the past. This means any posts that were previously shared with Friends of Friends or Public will now be shared just to Friends."

Of course, you also have the option of deleting your Facebook account. µ

 

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