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Woman gets £20k Orange bill for Facebook uploads from Turkey

Sunk almost £3k a day on the social network
Thu Sep 19 2013, 15:31
Man with magnet and money

AN ENGLISH WOMAN has been whacked with a big mobile phone bill after going on holiday for not comprehending roaming and uploading photos to Facebook.

We have been here before. People insist on taking their phones to other countries and using them as though they were at home. Usually the service provider will bend and say, "Don't worry, you won't have to pay." That's what has more or less happened here.

Helen Christie, 40, ran up her mobile bill on a travellers bundle, which she was wise to invest in. However, according to the Mirror newspaper she decided not to set a spending cap on her account.

If she had, she could have limited her spending to around £50. As it is she managed to run up a bill of £20,000. Orange has capitulated and said that circumstances convinced it to cut down the bill to less than £900.

"We know our customers want to use their smartphones abroad without worrying about a big bill. That's why we offer great value roaming bundles with discounts of over 90 [percent] on our standard rates," said the firm in a statement.

"In this case, the customer used much more data than her chosen bundle for Turkey. Due to the the exceptional circumstances, we've offered a significant reduction on the bill."

Christie, who we understand earns less that £10,000 a year and spent £700 on her week long holiday, intends to challenge Orange's decision to charge her in court.

Roaming charges are awful, of course, and it does not seem right for a service provider to run up a serious debt on a user's account because they upload sunbaked selfies.

That said, Orange enforces a roaming charges limit of £51 including VAT. Its users must explicitly opt out of this cap in order to run up a large bill. µ

 

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