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Foxconn sells display patents to Google

Put ‘em on the glass
Tue Aug 27 2013, 10:44
Google Glass is now available in the UK for 1000

CHINESE HARDWARE ASSEMBLER Foxconn has sold some display technology patents to Google that we can expect to see in its Glass glasses, or at least in Google's patent portfolio.

Foxconn's Hon Hai Precision Industry Company has confirmed the sale, saying it sold a "portion" of its patent portfolio to the internet giant.

"The portfolio technology consisted of Head Mounted Display ('HMD') technology patents. HMD technology consists of a computer-generated image, sometimes referred to as a virtual image which is superimposed on a real-world view," said Hon Hai.

"It is commonly used in aviation and tactical/ground displays, Engineering and Scientific design applications, Gaming and Video devices as well as Training and Simulation tools."

Terms of the deal have not been disclosed.

We have asked Google for comment. Usually it treats patents with some distaste and claims that it only bothers to have any because other companies have patents and use them aggressively.

It has been accused of using patents aggressively too, by parties including the European Commission and competitors.

In May Foxconn signed an Android licensing deal with Microsoft and spoke about the many patents that it holds.

"Hon Hai is the world's largest contract electronics manufacturer that holds more than 54,000 patents worldwide. We recognize and respect the importance of international efforts that seek to protect intellectual property," said Samuel Fu, director of the Intellectual Property Department at Hon Hai.

"The licensing agreement with Microsoft represents those efforts and our continued support of international trade agreements that facilitate implementation of effective patent protection." µ

 

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