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Halo: Spartan Assault is out for Windows Phone 8 handsets

So there, Android and iPhone users
Mon Aug 19 2013, 16:56
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DEVELOPER OF SOFTWARE TOYS Microsoft has released the Windows Phone 8 version of Halo: Spartan Assault.

Spartan Assault is like Halo but a lot less frenetic. Rather than being a first person shooter it is an over the shoulder shooter that has been described as epic by 343 Industries and Microsoft, and no doubt will thrill the handful of Windows Phone-using Halo fans out there.

"Halo: Spartan Assault brings the excitement of Halo combat to touch based devices for the very first time," reads the game's description.

"Battle your way through 25 action-packed missions against the Covenant as you explore the origin of the Spartan Ops program and Halo 4's Spartan Commander."

The game is available at the Windows Phone store in the US now and costs a cent under $7.

The action takes place somewhere between Halo 3 and Halo 4 and it is supposed to be quite an exciting package.

"Set between the events of Halo 3 and Halo 4, Halo: Spartan Assault is a new chapter of the award winning Halo universe that explores the first missions of the Spartan Ops program and dives deeper into the backstory of Human-Covenant wars," said Microsoft.

"Play through the eyes of either Commander Sarah Palmer or Spartan Davis stationed aboard the UNSC Infinity as they fight never before seen battles against Covenant forces."

The game was released for Windows 8 near the end of July. This is not its first appearance on the Windows Phone 8 alternative, since it has been a Verizon exclusive for a few weeks. However, it is the first time that Microsoft has released a mobile version of the Halo game.

Now any Spartans can get involved. Verizon or otherwise. µ

 

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