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Chubby Checker vs HP dinkle checker goes to court

Let's do the legal twist
Mon Aug 19 2013, 15:53
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IN A CRUEL TWIST OF FATE, HP can be sued by the singer known as Chubby Checker because someone made a manhood-measuring app, released it for HP Palm devices, and called it a Chubby Checker.

Mr Checker's lawyer, a man with the apposite name of Willie Gary, reckoned that there is plenty of money in this, and has called the case a "multi-million dollar" lawsuit.

"This lawsuit is about preserving the integrity and legacy of a man who has spent years working hard at his musical craft and has earned the position of one of the greatest musical entertainers of all time," said Gary.

"We cannot sit idly and watch as technology giants or anyone else exploits the name or likeness of an innocent person with the goal of making millions of dollars. The Defendants have marketed Chubby Checker's name on their product to gain a profit and this just isn't right."

HP is perhaps understandably not keen to dwell too much on the app, the court case, or indeed anyone's genitals. It repeated its earlier statement to The INQUIRER, trying to distance itself from the application.

"The application was not created by HP or Palm," it said. "It was removed in September 2012 and is no longer on any Palm or HP hosted web site."

The situation is just one more painful reminder for HP of its mistake in purchasing Palm, considering the less than successful outcome of the purchase and HP's foray into the smartphone business.

According to Reuters, a judge has let the lawsuit proceed, and Ernest Evans aka Chubby Checker can pursue his claims against HP and its Palm unit.

US District Court Judge William Alsup said that in this instance the word Chubby is being "used as a vulgar pun". µ

 

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