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Nokia reportedly plans a 5.2in phablet and 10in Windows RT slate

Bets the company on Microsoft
Thu Aug 15 2013, 14:40
Nokia Lumia 925 has a 4.5in AMOLED Clearblack display

FINNISH PHONE MAKER Nokia reportedly plans to launch a 5.2in phablet device and a 10in Windows RT tablet this year.

Chinese news website Dopsy managed to get its hands on a promotional picture of the device, tipped to launch as the Nokia Lumia 825, which unlike the big screen Lumia 625 will be a high-end device.

If this leak is the real deal, the Nokia Lumia 825 will have a quad-core 1.2GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor along with a 5.2in display. Unfortunately, despite its size, this won't be the first HD 1080p Windows Phone device, with the handset instead featuring a 1280x720 resolution screen.

That's pretty much all we know about Nokia's upcoming Windows Phone 'phablet' device so far, with its announcement reportedly set for October.

The launch of the Nokia Lumia 825 reportedly will be coupled with the Finnish firm's first tablet announcement. This, according to Microsoft News, will be a 10in Windows RT tablet that will run Microsoft's upcoming Windows 8.1 operating system. This tablet reportedly will have a nippy quad-core 2.15GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor and, unlike the Lumia 825 smartphone, a HD 1080p display.

Set to mimic Microsoft's Surface Pro tablet with a bundled keyboard and stylus, Nokia's Windows 8.1 tablet is also tipped to feature full-sized USB ports, a micro-HDMI port, 32GB of internal storage and all of the usual connectivity options such as Bluetooth and WiFi.

Following its unveiling in October, the month when Microsoft plans to release Windows 8.1, Nokia's debut tablet is likely to arrive on shelves in November.

Nokia has not yet commented on the rumours. µ

 

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