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Apple replaces dodgy power adapters for $10

Updated Turn in dangerous fakes for the real things
Tue Aug 06 2013, 09:42
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GADGET DESIGNER Apple is offering anyone who is concerned that they might have a cheap fake power adapter the chance to swap it for a reasonably priced real one.

The trade-in amnesty comes on the heels of reports about faulty mobile phone chargers and the problems that they might cause. Such chargers have been linked to fires and even one death, and though they are not peculiar to Apple, the company is acting to limit its customers' exposure to risk.

"Recent reports have suggested that some counterfeit and third party adapters may not be designed properly and could result in safety issues. While not all third party adapters have an issue, we are announcing a USB Power Adapter Takeback Program to enable customers to acquire properly designed adapters," Apple said in a blog post.

"Customer safety is a top priority at Apple. That's why all of our products - including USB power adapters for iPhone, iPad, and iPod - undergo rigorous testing for safety and reliability and are designed to meet government safety standards around the world."

The trade-in offer starts on 16 August and from that date anyone who suspects that their charger might be fake can take it to an Apple store or authorised retailer.

Once there they will be offered to exchange their fake cheap charger for a real cheap charger. Apple will offer legitimate power adapters for half off their shelf price, so about a tenner. That is an assumption for the time being.

Apple's blog prices the charger at $10, and we are waiting for information about the UK price. The trade-in offer will run until mid-October.

Update
Apple told us that it will roll out the charger change up in the UK later this month. µ

 

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