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Texas Instruments releases chips to provide HD 720p touchscreens in cars

Tries to improve the quality of in-car entertainment
Wed Jul 03 2013, 16:35
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CHIPMAKER Texas Instruments released serialiser and deserialiser chips that promise to bring high definition touchscreen LCD panels to cars.

Texas Instruments has been promoting its automotive business as the firm tries to move away from expensive system on chip (SoC) silicon intended for consumer electronics. The firm hopes to bring consumer experiences into the automotive market and has announced its Serdes serialiser and deserialiser chips for car information systems.

Texas Instruments said the chips can be used to power high definition (HD) 720p resolution LCD touchscreens that display 24-bit colour with high frame rate control and 7.1 surround sound. The firm said the chips can allow carmakers to have a uniform entertainment and information system across their ranges from low-end cars to luxury vehicles using the same silicon.

Texas Instruments' DS90UH927Q-Q1 and DS90UH928Q-Q1 serialiser and deserialiser chips, respectively, also support high bandwidth digital content protection, meaning they can playback DRM content and use the industry standard low voltage digital signalling (LVDS) input and output sources. The firm claimed that its use of LVDS cuts the number of signal lines and opens the opportunity for having more video sources.

Car manufacturers are trying to improve in-car entertainment and information interfaces, taking design cues from consumer electronics devices such as smartphones and tablets. However since automotive electronics regulations are more stringent than those of consumer electronics devices, things like HD 720p resolution screens are cutting edge, whereas consumer tablets with 2560x1600 resolution displays have been available for months.

Texas Instruments said its serialiser and deserialiser chips will sell for $9.75 in 1,000 unit quantities and are available now. µ

 

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