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Red Hat releases Fedora 19 with 3D printing support

Makes the jump away from Oracle's MySQL
Wed Jul 03 2013, 13:36
Fedora 15 LibreOffice screen shot

LINUX VENDOR Red Hat has released Fedora 19, codenamed Schrödinger's Cat, which has support for 3D printing and is the first to use MariaDB as its default SQL database instead of Oracle's MySQL.

Red Hat's Fedora Linux distribution is the testing ground for the firm's hugely successful Enterprise Linux (RHEL) distribution, and for that reason it heralds what will appear in future releases of RHEL. The firm's Fedora 19 release brings support for 3D printing through OpenSCAD, Skeinforge, SFACT, Printrun and Repetierhost, and it is the first release to make MariaDB the default SQL database server implementation in place of Oracle's MySQL.

The Fedora Project was criticised for delaying its Fedora 18 release, however Fedora 19 appeared on time. Fedora's latest release includes Gnome 3.8 and the capability to enable Gnome Classic, a Gnome 2 type user interface, along with KDE Plasma 4.10 and Mate 1.6, with other window managers such as Xfce and Lxde available in different spins.

As Red Hat sponsors the Fedora Project it is not surprising to see Fedora include Openshift, the firm's platform as a service infrastructure. Fedora 19 also includes node.js and Ruby 2.0, but arguably its biggest move is away from Oracle's MySQL to the community maintained MariaDB fork, which suggests that eventually RHEL will make MariaDB its default SQL database implementation.

The Fedora Project has said that work on Fedora 20 has been in active development for several months and it plans to release that in November.

Fedora 19 is available for download from regional mirrors and users can also use Fed Up to upgrade from previous versions of the distribution. µ

 

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