The Inquirer-Home

Apple applies for 'iWatch' trademark in multiple countries

Updated Hints that Apple's wearable technology is coming soon
Tue Jul 02 2013, 17:06
The Pebble smartwatch has four multi-purpose buttons

GADGET DESIGNER Apple has filed a trademark application for "iWatch" in Japan, adding weight to rumours that the firm will enter the wearable technology market this year.

So saie Bloomberg, which reported today that Apple is seeking to protect the product name "iWatch", which it has categorised unsurprisingly as a "handheld computer or watch device". Apple apparently filed the trademark application with the Japanese Patent Office on 3 June.

Adding more weight to the iWatch rumours, a Taiwanese newspaper reported recently that Apple is testing 1.5in OLED screens, having shipped 1,000 units to Foxconn. Unless Apple's next iPhone is going to be much smaller than expected, we'll place our bets on Apple producing a watch device.

Not much else is known about Apple's iWatch, though, and given its size, there's probably not going to be much to find out.

If speculation is to be believed, the iWatch will act as a 'second screen' for the iPhone and iPad, enabling users to glance at their wrists to see missed calls, messages and social media notifications. There are also likely to be music controls for music playing through an iPhone, for example, which it will do using Bluetooth connectivity.

We also know that Apple's iWatch will face competition. Samsung has already confirmed that it's working on a smart watch device to act as a companion for its Galaxy smartphones and tablets, while Sony announced its second generation Smartwatch in London last week.

Pricing and availability of Apple's iWatch remain a mystery for now.

Update
Apple has also applied for the iWatch trademark in Mexico, Turkey and Taiwan, according to reports. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Dead electronic devices to be banned on US-bound flights

Will the new rules banning uncharged devices be effective?