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Opera reveals security breach

A few thousand Windows users might have been affected
Thu Jun 27 2013, 11:48
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SOFTWARE COMPANY Opera has revealed that it was the victim of a security attack earlier this month.

In a blog post the firm said that it managed to contain the attack that it found on its servers in the middle of last week. It explained that its systems have been tidied up now and the attack will be the subject of investigation by the authorities.

"[At] Opera Software, we are committed to the security and privacy of our users. This is paramount to us, and as such, we want to share the details of a recent incident with you," said the firm.

"On June 19th we uncovered, halted and contained a targeted attack on our internal network infrastructure. Our systems have been cleaned and there is no evidence of any user data being compromised. We are working with the relevant authorities to investigate its source and any potential further extent. We will let you know if there are any developments."

Opera said that the impact of the attack looks to be "limited", explaining that the attackers were able to get their hands on "at least one old and expired Opera code signing certificate".

It added that this let the attackers sign some malware and distribute it under the guise of Opera software.

"It is possible that a few thousand Windows users, who were using Opera between 01.00 and 01.36 UTC on June 19th, may automatically have received and installed the malicious software," said the blog post.

"To be on the safe side, we will roll out a new version of Opera which will use a new code signing certificate."

Opera didn't provide more information, so we can't say how many users were actually affected. The firm said users are strongly urged to update to the latest version of Opera as soon as they can. µ

 

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