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Oracle announces nine year collaboration with rival Salesforce

Will bring CRM software to its cloud while providing database and Linux support
Wed Jun 26 2013, 15:22
oracle

ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE VENDOR Oracle has announced a nine year partnership with the CRM software vendor Salesforce to use Oracle Linux, Java and Oracle's cloud services.

Oracle began the week by announcing that it will port Oracle Linux, which is derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux, along with Oracle Database and Weblogic software to Windows Azure. Now the firm has announced a deal with rival CRM vendor Salesforce that will see the firm using Oracle software and cloud services to power its services.

Salesforce said it will standardise on Oracle's Linux distribution, Oracle DB and Java middleware. Oracle said it will work on integrating Salesforce's software on its Fusion HCM and Financial Cloud services and provide the hardware needed to power Salesforce applications.

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison said, "When customers choose cloud applications they expect rapid low-cost implementations; they also expect application integrations to work right out of the box - even when the applications are from different vendors.

"That's why Marc [Benioff, CEO of Salesforce] and I believe it's important that our two companies work together to make it happen, and integrate the Salesforce and Oracle Clouds."

Oracle's stance on partnering with firms that compete with its own software products seems to have softened considerably. Salesforce's CRM software is a direct competitor to its own range of CRM products and while it has picked up another cloud, database and Java customer, one has to wonder whether ceding at least part of the extremely lucrative CRM market for nearly a decade is the best move for Oracle. µ

 

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