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Samsung releases PCI-Express SSD for ultrabooks

A week after Apple puts it in the Macbook Air
Mon Jun 17 2013, 13:05
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MEMORY MAKER Samsung has released a PCI-Express solid-state disk (SSD) drive for ultrabooks.

Last week Apple's Macbook Air refresh brought in not only Intel's Haswell processor, but also an SSD drive that uses the PCI-Express bus. Now Samsung, which makes the SSD in the 13in Macbook Air, has released a PCI-Express SSD intended for use in ultrabooks.

Samsung's XP941 SSD comes in 128GB, 256GB and 512GB capacities, with read bandwidth of 1.4GB/s and a weight of six grams, far less than the 1.8in or 2.5in SSDs that typically are used in laptops. The firm did not cite write speeds, though most consumer workloads do not saturate write bandwidth, and it wouldn't be surprising if the write bandwidth is within SATA 3 specifications.

Young-Hyun Jun, EVP of memory sales and marketing at Samsung Electronics said, "With the Samsung XP941, we have become the first to provide the highest performance PCIe SSD to global PC makers so that they can launch leading-edge ultra-slim notebook PCs this year.

"Samsung plans to continue timely delivery of the most advanced PCIe SSD solutions with higher density and performance, and support global IT companies providing an extremely robust computing environment to consumers."

Samsung added that it will develop 10nm class NAND chips to be used in PCI-Express SSDs and will research non-volatile memory chips for use in high density SSDs. However the firm said that 10nm class NAND chips will be intended for PCI-Express SSDs used in laptops and ultrabooks, which all but guarantees that PCI-Express SSDs will feature in high-end laptops within the next 18 months. µ

 

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